4/28 – Introduction to Middle School Memoir

HOMEWORK:

  • Enjoy your weekend!

I am not at school today, so students will be working with a sub.

Middle School Memoir:

  • Students will begin the rough draft of their middle school memoir. In this writing piece, students will be reflecting on their three-year middle school experience: how they have grown as students and people, who has helped them along the way, and lessons they will take into their future.
  • The memoir should be about 700-1000 words. The requirements are on Google Classroom.

4/25-4/26 – Thirteen Reasons Assessment

HOMEWORK:

  • Finish assessment!
  • Did you miss any of the clips? There will be a make-up session Monday during lunch!

VIDEO OF THE WEEK: Why are sloths so slow?

 

Assessment: 

  • Students began text-to-film part the assessment on Tuesday. During class, I showed three different clips from the first episode of Thirteen Reasons Why. In the assessment, students had to identify the change and analyze the director’s choice to move away from the original text.
  • On Wednesday, students finished the assessment in class using their resources. Students were able to use the notes in the slideshow about dramatic irony and character POV. Also, if students put in the effort to complete and correct answers from their practice activity on Friday, they were able to use those answers on the assessment.

4/24 – Text-To-Film Adaptations

HOMEWORK:

  • Catch up on practice work from Thirteen Reasons

Quick Write: Students took about 5 minutes to brainstorm as many ideas as possible around these questions: Why do directors make changes to an original text when making a film adaptation? What are some examples of texts that have been made into movies?

Activity: During class, I showed the students three different clips from the first episode of Thirteen Reasons Why. For each clip, students had to identify the change from the text to the film, infer as to why the director made the change, and analyze how the change affects the story.

4/21 – Dramatic Irony & Character POV

HOMEWORK:

  • Finish “Practice: Dramatic Irony & Character POV” if you did not complete this in class

Mini-lessons: Dramatic Irony & Character POV

RL.8.6 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

Here is the link to the Google Slideshow I went over in class.

Work time: Students applied the concepts from the mini-lesson to their readings. See Google Classroom for the assignment (“Practice: Dramatic Irony & Character POV”)

Debrief: We discussed the answers to the practice questions in class.

4/20 – Differing Perspectives

HOMEWORK:

  • Finish “Behind the Scenes: Differing Perspectives”

Reading time:

Finish the 1st selected reading (pages 1-35 of Thirteen Reasons Why OR short story “Sucker” by Carson McCullers)

Differing Perspectives activity:

As an introductory activity to the following standard…

RL.8.6 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

Students used their real-life experiences to think about how different perspectives can “change” a story. For this activity, they thought back to a time their words/actions upset or hurt someone OR a time their words/actions got them in trouble. First, they wrote a letter to themselves from the person they offended, offering up a believable point of view from that person’s perspective of the event. Then, they wrote a letter to that person from themselves, explaining their side of the story. This activity asks students to put themselves in someone else’s shoes and think about how their actions/words affect others. See Google Classroom for the assignment.

Debrief: Students shared out a few lines from their letters with a partner.

4/18 – 4/19 – Thirteen Reasons Why Anticipation Guide

HOMEWORK:

  • Finish the Thirteen Reasons Why anticipation guide

Today we are beginning a mini-unit (it’ll be two weeks!) to explore two standards:

 

  • RL.8.6 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.
  • RL.8.7 Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

We will be using selections/clips from the novel/show Thirteen Reasons Why. There are some sensitives topics (suicide, sexual assault) that come up in the premise of this novel, so we will be discussing it before we begin reading. We feel like it is important to address these topics with adults (both teachers and counselors) in 8th grade as these students will be entering high school next year.

Today (4/18) students will fill out an “Anticipation Guide” which asks them to agree/disagree with various statements that relate to topics in the readings. This is an opportunity for students to think for themselves and decide where they stand on some of these issues.

Tomorrow (4/19) I will ask students via Google form to vote for topics they would like to discuss in class. I’ll pick a few and invite students to share their thoughts from their anticipation guide. While student voices will be heard, I will also offer professional resources and adult moderation about these topics to keep reality in perspective.